Rae Morris presents Make-up Trends for 2014 – IMATS Sydney 2013

I spent most of Saturday at the International Makeup Artist Trade Show (IMATS) in Sydney, and this is my 5th year in a row attending this exciting event. One of the highlights of IMATS for me each year is having the opportunity to learn from some of the greatest working makeup artists in the world, through a series of free workshops included as part of the ticket price. This year, the stand-out workshop for me was Rae Morris’ Trend Presentation for 2014.

Rae Morris Trend Presentation 2014

If you have ever met Rae, she is one of the loveliest, most hyperactive people I have ever met, with a wealth of knowledge she seems to be itching to share. I took a few key pieces of information out of her presentation, and I wanted to share them with you all today.

Rae’s 2014 Trend Forecast

Makeup can be at it’s most fashionable when an element is missing, or not done. For example, perfectly polished makeup with messy hair, bold eye makeup with no lip, or bleached or blocked-out eyebrows.

Rae Morris Trend Forecast 2014 Look 1

For this look, Rae created a tan on this naturally very pale model, by using a darker shade of yellow-based foundation over all visible skin. She combed a very pale concealer through the models brows to emphasise their paleness. Rae contoured the cheekbones and jawline. She then added a rose blush to the models cheeks before using bronzing powder on the high points of the models face. She added some highlights, then used a technique called face taping to lift the angle of the brows and eyes.
The aspects of this look that were left “undone” were: no mascara, no lipstick, bleached brows.

Rae Morris Trend Forecast 2014 Look 2

For this look, Rae created a very bold statement eye on a base of very beautiful creamy skin.
To balance this look, there was no blush and no lip.

Rae Morris Trend Forecast 2014 Look 3

For this look, Rae created another very bold statement smoky eye, in a shape designed to flatter an asian eye. She added a strong highlight in the middle of the bottom lashline to create extra drama.
This look was contoured, but lips and blush were left undone.

Rae Morris Trend Forecast 2014 Look 4

My favourite look of the presentation.
This model had her eyebrows completely removed (I’m not sure if they were blocked out or shaved – it looks to me like they were shaved).
Rae created a strong, graphic eyeliner look, which she emphasised further using face taping. Skin was kept creamy and smooth, and a perfect neutral red lip was added (slightly underdrawing the models natural lip-line).
The aspects of this look left undone were the models hair, the missing eyebrows and the lack of blush.

Rae Morris Trend Forecast 2014 Look 5

Rae created another bold smoky eye, although this was a little more blended around the edges. This model also had bleached brows, which Rae further emphasised by combing a pale concealer through them.
Other than some understated contouring, the rest of this models face was left virtually undone.
At the last moment, Rae added some eye gloss for added impact.

Rae Morris Trend Forecast 2014 Look 6

For the last look (and the only male look) Rae created her signature glitter mask. The only thing she added was a touch of highlighter on this models cupid’s bow.
The aspects of this makeup left undone were the lips and lashes.

Technical advice for makeup application

To create the effect of bleached eyebrows, take a very pale cream concealer on a metal lash comb. Work the concealer into the root of the brows and comb through. Apparently this can work on even the darkest of brows.

A cheekbone contour should be no wider than the width of a finger, and should follow the line from the top of your ear to the corner of your mouth. It should be darkest at the hairline, and fade to nothingness along the vertical line from the outer corner of your eye.

Blush should only ever be applied above the contour line, whether that line is makeup or exists naturally.

If you are pale, applying bronzer will not make you look tanned. It is more likely to age your appearance.

If you are tanned (naturally or artificially) and you want to use bronzer on your face, apply a rose blush on your cheeks (above the contour line) first. It will create a more natural looking tanned effect.

When applying bronzer, don’t just apply it to your cheeks like a blush – it can create the illusion of hollow cheeks, which instantly ages you. Apply it on your hairline, cheekbones and high points of your face, where the sun naturally hits you.

When applying lipstick, slightly underdrawing the lipline will always look more youthful than overdrawing it, particularly along the lower lip.

General advice for Makeup Artists

In the current age of digital media, it can be very tempting to put images of amazing makeup you have created on your Social Media accounts and online portfolio, even if the hair, styling or photography is not 100% perfect. Rae suggests that this is a mistake. When she looks at a Makeup Artists work online, she assumes that they believe every image they associate themselves with is perfection. If you have questionable hair, styling or photography in your portfolio shots, it can cause clients to question your entire taste level.

Be very careful when branding yourself as an Editorial Makeup Artist. In the industry it is a prestigious title that is only awarded to Makeup Artists who have creatively directed the makeup for a fashion shoot in a reputable fashion magazine.

90% of true editorial work is unpaid – most truly successful Editorial Makeup Artists need to pick up commercial or bridal work to pay the bills.

Good editorial work takes hours, and it’s not uncommon to spend 3-4 hours working on a single model. If you are being rushed by a photographer, consult with them and come to a compromise as to what aspect of the makeup they are happy to forego to reduce your working time.

Editorial makeup doesn’t have to last for a long time, it simply needs to stay perfect for as long as it takes to get the shot. One example of this is the popular glossed eye look – on a shoot, that look typically lasts for 3-4 minutes before needing to be reworked or removed.

Which of the 6 looks created by Rae Morris was your favourite? 

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